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Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)

Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)

Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)(previously known as “Central Auditory Processing Disorder” (CAPD) is a disorder in the way auditory information is processed in the brain. It is not primarily due to a sensory (inner ear) or hearing impairment; individuals with APD usually have peripheral hearing within a normal range. APD is an umbrella term that describes a variety of problems in the neurological pathways between the ear and the brain that can interfere with processing auditory information including: inability to hear auditory messages, distinguish between similar sounds or words, separate relevant speech from background noise, and the ability to recall and comprehend what was heard. Auditory processing disorders can affect development of speech, language and communication as well as reading and spelling, resulting in dyslexia and/or problems with talking and understanding.
This range of difficulties can exist as discrete categories or in combination and include specific problems such as:

Hyperacuisis: Hyperacuisis describes hyper-sensitivity to all or specific frequencies of sound resulting in pain or discomfort, difficulty processing auditory information and attention problems. Hyperacuisis is sometimes a feature of Autistic Spectrum Disorder and associated behaviours.
Johansen Individualised Auditory Stimulation (IAS) does not set out to diagnose or treat Auditory Processing Disorder, which normally requires diagnosis by an audiologist and speech and language therapist.
Back in Balance using Johansen IAS can help to identify individual auditory processing difficulties and with the use of individual auditory stimulation, train the auditory system and related pathways to work more efficiently.